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The D Series: Tools to succeed at innovation

We are excited to announce the launch of our D!sturbance Series Workshops

These workshops qualify for professional development hours for many professional designations. (Check with your designation guidelines to be sure).

The D! Series was designed based on our two breakthrough business books, The 90% Rule and our new international best-seller, Cause a Disturbance. These workshops have been delivered privately to international businesses and associations for over five years. They are now available to all business leaders.

In an era of Disorder and Disruption, the D! Series is designed for leaders and change agents who want to cause their own disturbance, and shape their companies’ future. Whether you’re an entrepreneur, corporate executive or manager with a desire for continuous improvement, you can count on The D! Series to address the issues you face in your business with actionable solutions that you can begin to implement immediately.

Come on your own, bring a client, or book a table and put your whole team on the same innovation page.  BOOK TODAY at www.thedseries.com and, for a limited time, use the promotional code INTRO2015 to SAVE 50%.

The first workshop on innovation, Cause a Disturbance, focuses on:

  • How to generate more relevant ideas, more often
  • Innovation being cost effective and may actually save you money
  • The positive impact that new ideas have on your customer experience

The second workshop on change management, Sticky Change, focuses on:

  • Identifying and overcoming obstacles to change
  • Outlining a process for effective change execution
  • Incorporating change initiatives into your culture

Don’t see an event in your area? Or maybe you’d like to hold an exclusive event just for your organization? Contact Kim Vogel at kvogel@spyderworksdesign.com


Special thanks to our community sponsors:

                    

When is it okay to have your most loyal customers arrested?

Whether you’re a hockey fan or not, you have to admit that the Toronto Maple Leafs brand is addictively interesting.  In fact, I can’t think of a single company whose financial success has absolutely nothing to do with the quality of its product.

Ranked by Forbes Magazine as the National Hockey League’s most valuable franchise, we should be able to point to the Toronto Maple Leafs organization as a bastion of best practices, innovation and vision.  Instead, we see an organization that has fired at least two V.P.s, two assistant coaches and a head coach in the last six months and is paying at least three players millions of dollars in severance as they play for other teams.  Yet, despite its consistent underperformance as a team, the Leafs manage to pack their arena for every single game and draw Canada’s largest NHL television audience.  Is it mass hypnosis?  Is it a cult?

The latest intriguing bit of brand-building from the Leafs organization is a crack-down on Leaf fans who throw their jerseys onto the ice at the Air Canada Centre.  Not only are the jersey throwers ejected from the game they’re watching, but they’re also banned from Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment venues for a specified period and issued a police summons.  So, to sum up, a Toronto Maple Leafs customer spends probably between one and two hundred dollars for a ticket, between one hundred and one hundred and seventy dollars for a Maple Leafs jersey and in a fit of frustration because the team is playing indifferently, throws said jersey onto the ice.

I guess my question to the Toronto Maple Leafs organization is, ‘why would you want to punish a loyal customer who is willing to give you about three hundred dollars and is already cruelly disappointed by the quality of your product?  Hasn’t he suffered enough?  Why would you not take the fan quietly aside and tell him how much you appreciate his continued patronage and abjectly apologize for the performance and attitude of his beloved team?  Why would you not give him his jersey back with the, wink wink, promise that you’ll try to do better in the future and give him a $12 beer on the house?

Someday, the curse on the Leafs will lift and the team will win a Stanley Cup.  Either that, or the blue magic spell will wear off and Leafs customers will stop caring and spend their money somewhere else.  I know which scenario I’m betting on.

Did Target ever really come to Canada? Not according to their Mission Statement.

Leases in less than optimum locations, a weak supply chain and runaway ambition in opening 133 stores may have all ganged up to doom Target in Canada.  But, there’s one corporate failure that intrigues me even more.  Target ignored its own mission statement. ‘Our mission is to make Target your preferred shopping destination in all channels by delivering outstanding value, continuous innovation and exceptional guest experiences by consistently fulfilling our Expect More. Pay Less.® brand promise.’

Target must have known, before coming to Canada, that it wouldn’t be able to offer U.S. price points or U.S. selection.  It also must have known that those were the two things Canadians loved about shopping at Target south of the border.  So, here’s the $5.4 billion question… if you can’t get those two fundamental promises right, why bother coming to Canada at all?  The cheap chic appeal of Target didn’t travel well.

Maybe more than anything else, Target’s ungracious exit from Canada shines an uncomfortably bright light on the whole exercise of creating mission statements in the first place.  I think for many companies, mission statements and the accompanying brand promise are just corporate accessories that they feel are a mandatory part of a website or annual report.  Leaders and managers only seem to pay attention to them when it suits them and ignore them too often and too hastily when a shiny new opportunity arises. The result, yet another announcement in the media of a shuttered company. In this case, one that was ill-fated from the start by it’s seemingly altered promise of expect more, pay more and receive less, in Canada.

At Spyder Works, our brand promise is encapsulated in Building Business by Design®. Design, of course, referring to the thought and intention behind the creation of a new idea or direction. Whenever we are creating something for a client, we test it against that statement. Ensuring that whatever we create is single-mindedly focused on our client’s own promise to their customers.