small business

What Are You Already 90% Capable of Achieving? What is Your Next 10%?

Interview-with-Ken-Tencer

Ken Tencer was recently interviewed on Small Business Trends Radio about his book, The 90% Rule, co-written with John Paulo Cardoso. The main premise of The 90% Rule is that, in business, you need to understand your core business – what you’re already 90% capable of producing – in order to ask yourself what the next 10% can be. What the next product, service or process innovation can be for you to bring to market. What you are selling to your customers today and what you can sell to them tomorrow to keep them engaged.

The 90% Rule helps you to focus on your competencies and create a go-forward plan on what you can add to complement your core business. Because today, more than ever, you must be continually changing and improving your business offering to keep engaging your customers. In the interview, Ken also notes that innovation is relevant to every aspect of business, and range from small adaptations to large-scale ground breaking change.

Most importantly, Ken reinforces that innovation is a daily exercise, not a once-a-year chore. To learn more about The 90% Rule, listen to Ken’s interview here. Buy The 90% Rule book or book a consultation for in depth insight for how this process can help your business.

To learn more about The 90% Rule, listen to Ken’s interview here. Buy The 90% Rule book or book a consultation for in depth insight for how this process can help your business.

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Ken Tencer interviewed by Jim Blasingame at The Small Business Advocate

jim-blasingame-the-small-business-advocate

Ken Tencer joins Jim Blasingame at The Small Business Advocate Show. Ken speaks about encouraging you to focus on innovation as a continuous management practice in order to keep customers coming back. Introducing new products and services to clients will keep them engaged and interested in your business. Change is not a new thing; the velocity of change is. To keep up with the new business reality, Ken discusses how innovation and change don’t always have to be on a major scale. He describes how small changes and tweaks to your product and process are often enough.

To learn more about this concept, listen to the interview by clicking on Listen Now.

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Most trusted brands start here.

Branding Insights
One of a series by John Paulo Cardoso, Spyder Works Chief Creative Officer & Founder

brand-marketing

One of the guilty pleasures of being a branding professional is reading the annual parade of polls that list the world’s ‘most trusted brands’. If you’re a small or medium sized company, the chances are, you’re not on those lists. That’s why I tend to look at them for entertainment purposes only. But even though few companies will ever grow to the stature of Coca-Cola, Apple, Google or Mercedes Benz, there is a key lesson to be learned from ‘most trusted’ polling. And to me, that lesson is ‘know who you are’.

Understanding what is unique about your brand and why customers buy from you is the foundation of your success. If you stay true to those insights, they will guide you through your strategic planning, your product development and your market expansion. In other words, staying true to who you are will allow your customers to trust you.

When I ask my clients who they are, some have a tendency to translate the question into ‘what are you?’ And they might answer with something like, “We’re the second largest manufacturer of low-flow control systems in the tri-state area.” Then I’ll nudge them into telling me why. And that’s where we begin the brand building process. Whether they tell me that they have the most stringent quality controls in their industry, the lowest prices or the best after-sales service, what they’re really articulating is what makes them a unique brand and why their customers trust them. They are defining the active ingredient in their brand. And knowing that is the battering ram that opens the door to future possibilities. It gives both of us the plotline we need to tell the company’s story and grow into the number one manufacturer of low-flow control systems in the tri-state area.

Lesson learned is that you don’t need to have revenues in the tens of millions to be a most trusted brand. You just need to be true to who you are.

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